ALCOHOL SELF-TEST

  • Pint of Regular
    Beer/Lager/Cider
  • Alcopop or
    Can of Lager
  • Glass of wine
    (175ml)
  • Single Measure
    of Spirits
  • Bottle of
    Wine

If you’re wondering whether you’re drinking too much or are worried about someone else, please take our drink test to see how you (or they) are doing!

START

1.

Question

RESULTS:Your Score:

Scores 0 - 7 : Low risk

Good news! Your score indicates that you are drinking at a safe level. Continuing as you are means that you are least likely to develop (alcohol-related) health problems in the near or long-term future.

If your circumstances change or you are concerned about a loved one, your GP, www.cri.org.uk or your Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. http://www.downyourdrink.org.uk/ has useful tips for people thinking about reducing / stopping their alcohol use.

The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often referred to as binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

Scores 8 - 15: Increasing risk

Your score indicates you are drinking at ‘increasing risk’, and although you may not be aware of it now, your drinking may be putting your future health at risk, and may already be affecting your sleep patterns, energy levels and mood.

If you would like support to reduce or stop your alcohol use, or are concerned about a loved one, your GP, www.cri.org.uk or your Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. Alternatively, http://www.downyourdrink.org.uk/ has useful tips for people thinking about reducing / stopping their alcohol use. For advice on sexual health visit http://www.thesite.org/ or www.tht.org.uk

The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

Scores 16 - 19 : Higher risk

Your score indicates you are a ‘higher risk’ drinker, and may already be aware of the impact that alcohol is having on your health, which is likely to include difficulties such as irregular heart beat and high blood pressure, disrupted sleep patterns, energy levels and mood. You are in a group at (significantly) increasing risk of sustaining alcohol-related harms such as pancreatitis and cancers in the future. Daily or almost daily drinkers are at most risk in this group. ‘Binge-drinkers’ in this group are giving themselves something of a break during the week, but are more at risk from accidents such as falls. You can improve the consequences for your health by taking small steps such as cutting down or drinking lower-strength drinks, such as changing spirits for lager. http://www.downyourdrink.org.uk/ has useful tips for people thinking about reducing / stopping their alcohol use.

If you would like support to reduce or stop your alcohol use, or are concerned about a loved one, your GP, www.cri.org.uk or your Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. Alternatively, if you are supporting someone who is reliant / dependent on alcohol, visit www.adfam.org.uk. For advice on sexual health visit http://www.thesite.org/ or www.tht.org.uk

The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

Scores 20 + : Possible dependence / heavy binge-drinking

Your high score indicates you are potentially physically / psychologically dependent on alcohol, or are a heavy binge-drinker. Drinking at extremely high levels can lead to physical dependence on alcohol, when the body needs alcohol to function. Withdrawal symptoms may include shaking, sweats, tremors that only stop when you have a drink. If you experience these symptoms it may not be safe for you to stop drinking without medical support. Withdrawal from alcohol may cause fitting, loss of consciousness and in some cases, death. Your GP, www.cri.org.uk or Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. If you are caring for someone who is reliant / dependent on alcohol please access the same sources of support, or visit www.adfam.org.uk

If you do not identify as being a dependent drinker, you may already be aware of the impact that alcohol is having on your health. The level you are drinking at is likely to be causing you difficulties such as alcohol-related accidents and falls, irregular heart beat and high blood pressure, and affecting your sleep patterns, energy levels and mood. In addition to these factors you are in the group at most risk of sustaining alcohol-related harms such as pancreatitis and cancers in the future. Daily or almost daily drinkers are at most risk. You can improve the consequences for your health by taking small steps such as cutting down or drinking lower-strength drinks, such as changing spirits for lager. If you are not ready for treatment or are concerned about a loved one, http://www.downyourdrink.org.uk/ has useful tips for people thinking about reducing / stopping their alcohol use. For advice on sexual health visit http://www.thesite.org/ or www.tht.org.uk

The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

0 score. No alcohol-related risk.

Congratulations! As a young person who doesn’t drink you will be enjoying all the benefits of life without alcohol. The numbers of young people (and adults) who choose not to drink are increasing, despite what you hear in the media. You probably have more interesting things to get into such as sport, music or study, perhaps your religion, culture or family don’t allow it, you just don’t like it or have had a bad experience; whatever the reason you’ve made a good choice! If you’d like to find out more about issues affecting young people, or are worried about a friend, visit http://www.thesite.org/ for advice. http://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/ supports young people and families affected by a family member’s drinking.

1 - 7 score: Lower risk

There is no safe drinking level for young people under the age of 18. Alcohol affects people in very different ways, and is a powerful and dangerous drug. Drinking too much in a single session can kill, and more often can lead to accidents, risky behaviour and getting into trouble with the police. More and more people in their 20s are starting to develop life-threatening health problems because of the amount they’ve drunk during their teens. Your GP, www.cri.org.uk or Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. If you are not ready for treatment or are concerned about a loved one, http://www.thesite.org/ has lots of useful information for young people. http://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/ supports young people and families affected by a family member’s drinking.

The advice for ADULTS is;
The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

8 - 15 score: Increasing risk

There is no safe drinking level for young people under the age of 18. Alcohol affects people in very different ways, and is a powerful and dangerous drug. Drinking too much in a single session can kill, and more often can lead to accidents, risky behaviour and getting into trouble with the police. More and more people in their 20s are starting to develop life-threatening health problems because of the amount they’ve drunk during their teens. Although you may not be aware of it now, your drinking may be putting your future health at risk, and may already be affecting your sleep patterns, relationships, energy levels and mood. Your GP, www.cri.org.uk or Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. If you are not ready for treatment or are concerned about a friend or loved one, http://www.thesite.org/ has lots of useful information for young people. http://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/ supports young people and families affected by a family member’s drinking.

The advice for ADULTS is;
The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

16 - 19 score: Higher risk

There is no safe drinking level for young people under the age of 18. Alcohol affects people in very different ways, and is a powerful and dangerous drug. Drinking too much in a single session can kill, and more often can lead to accidents, risky behaviour and getting into trouble with the police. More and more people in their 20s are starting to develop life-threatening health problems because of the amount they’ve drunk during their teens. Although you may not be aware of it now, your drinking may be putting your future health at risk, and may already be affecting your sleep patterns, relationships, energy levels and mood. Your GP, www.cri.org.uk or Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. If you are not ready for treatment or are concerned about a friend or loved one, http://www.thesite.org/ has lots of useful information for young people. If you are supporting someone who is reliant / dependent on alcohol please access the same sources of support, or visit www.adfam.org.uk. http://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/ supports young people and families affected by a family member’s drinking.

The advice for ADULTS is;
The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)

20 score. Possible dependence / heavy binge drinking

Your high score indicates you are potentially physically dependent on alcohol, or are a heavy binge-drinker. You are drinking at extremely high levels and may find that you need a drink to function, and that you experience shaking which only stop when you have a drink. If you experience these symptoms it may not be safe for you to stop drinking without medical support. Withdrawal from alcohol may cause you to fit, lose consciousness and in the worst case-scenario, to die. Your GP, www.cri.org.uk or Local Authority website will be able to signpost you to specialist support in your area. If you are not ready for treatment or are concerned about a friend or loved one, http://www.thesite.org/ has lots of useful information for young people. If you are supporting someone who is reliant / dependent on alcohol please access the same sources of support, or visit www.adfam.org.uk. http://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/ supports young people and families affected by a family member’s drinking.

The advice for ADULTS is;
The NHS advises that women should not regularly drink more than 2 – 3 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. The NHS advises that men should not regularly drink more than 3- 4 units a day, with two or more alcohol-free days per week. Advice for pregnant women is that they should avoid drinking alcohol, as should women trying to conceive. If women choose to drink when pregnant they are advised not to drink more than 2 units once or twice a week to avoid harming their baby, and should not get drunk. Adults drinking heavily in one session, often called binge drinking, should allow 48 hours for their body to recover.

(Information adapted from NHS Choices website)